To kick things off, recall the module overview. Near the end of the first parag

     To kick things off, recall the module overview. Near the end of the first paragraph, it states that intercollegiate athletes are generally not compensated monetarily for their athletic endeavors. This may not come as a surprise to you. What may come as a surprise is the amount of revenue that colleges and universities at major Division I schools generate as a direct result of their athletes. According to USA Today, the top 20 schools (in terms of revenue) each generate over $100 million in revenue annually. That is over two billion dollars total from just 20 schools.
    Part 1: Advocates of the NCAA accurately point out that student-athletes are compensated in the form of a free college education that most students pay tens (sometimes hundreds) of thousands of dollars for and some students are able to earn money due to the Name, Image, Likeness (NIL) rule that was passed in 2021. Yet, many critics, and increasingly many athletes, do not feel this is adequate or fair compensation relative to total revenues. What do you think? Should student-athletes who generate that much money for their schools be considered employees who are compensated accordingly? Or, is their existing compensation (namely a free education and the potential of NIL money) adequate? There is no right or wrong answer, but you need to argue your side of the debate with supporting resources.
    Part 2: Next, think back and consider all that you have learned throughout this course. What elements of sport management stood out to you as the most complicated, interesting, or difficult? Finally, how can you apply what you have learned in this course at your previous, current, or future employer?

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